INTERVIEW QUESTION: WHY ARE YOU LEAVING YOUR JOB?

INTERVIEW QUESTION: WHY ARE YOU LEAVING YOUR JOB?

I can guarantee you that this question will come up in your next job interview. Unless you’ve never worked a day in your life, you’ll need to talk about why you left your last job or why you want to leave your current position.

Sometimes the answer is obvious as in the case of an internship. When the internship ends, you have to leave obviously. However, for real jobs, you have to explain why you want another job when you have one already. This is a question you really want to prepare for, the wrong answer can ruin your chances of getting the job.

There are several reasons for leaving a job and it all boils down to the following:

You were dissatisfied:

“I learned a lot at my current job in the first one year and then in subsequent years, the learning declined. I’m very eager to learn new things. I can’t see any opportunity for advancement within the organization and I love to be challenged.”

You were fired: if you were fired for performance reasons, you could mention this but avoid putting the blame on others. If you were fired, your interviewer will try to determine if it was due to integrity or performance issues.

“After some management changes, it became clear that the new department director had new expectations for the role that didn’t really mesh with my strengths. Ultimately, she decided to bring in someone from her previous organization who had more sales experience.

The experience taught me that my real talent is in customer service and I know I would be a major asset in a role like this one, which focuses on improving the customer experience. Would you like me to tell you more about my experience in that area?”

You were laid off:

“the company’s biggest client was shut down. This resulted in an extreme decline in the company’s revenue. Therefore, the management decided to eliminate some positions and I was among the five most recently hired employees in my organisation. I am very proud of the work I did for them while I was there and my former boss is one of my references.”

Better opportunity:

“I haven’t had the opportunity to use my graphic design skills as much as I would like to and I believe your company will give me that opportunity.”

Whichever way you decide to answer this question, make sure you focus on the positive. Do not speak ill of your former boss or co-workers.

Interview Question: How do you solve problems at work?

Interview Question: How do you solve problems at work?

In nearly every sector, problem-solving is one of the key skills required by employers. Therefore, there is a high probability that the question will come up during an interview to test your problem-solving skills.

To answer this question, think of challenges you have encountered in academic, work or volunteer settings and how you tackled them. You can follow these steps in answering the question:

  1. Define the Problem: explain why the situation was problematic
    Describe in detail how you gathered data, facts, and other information needed to develop solutions.
  2. Describe in detail how you determined the cause of the problem? Determined the factors that led to the problem? Developed strategies to resolve it?
  3. Explain in detail how you resolved the problem by describing why you selected specific strategies, explaining your objective, illustrating how you transformed ideas into practical solutions, and how you followed up with co-workers. Additionally, explain how you conducted risk management.
  4. Explain in detail what was accomplished and what strategies proved effective. Explain lessons learned and what you would do to avoid future occurrence of the same problem.

Here is an example of how the question should be answered:

The retail store I worked at was getting a lot of complaints about delivering orders late.

I had a meeting with the staff involved in the customer delivery process and discovered that the consignments were not being sent to the delivery team on time.

I investigated and found that customer requests were not being being processed fast enough. The problem was with the orders department as they were not following up efficiently with the suppliers. A system for efficient and timely follow up was immediately implemented.

This sorted out the stock problem and the delivery guys were able to  meet their deadlines.